Apply now to join the leadership team of NYU’s first ever Humanities Ambassador Club for undergraduate students

Ambassadors-IliadAttention NYU Sophomores and Juniors: Apply now to join the leadership team of NYU’s first ever Humanities Ambassador Club for undergraduate students!

With support from the Humanities Initiative at NYU, the club will organize a series of events during the Spring 2014 semester to strengthen the voice and identity of the humanities undergraduate student community, with a special focus on exploring how a humanities education can prepare students for a wide range of successful careers.

Read more and apply: http://nyuhumanities.org/ambassadors/

Application deadline: November 20, 2013

Verdi’s Third Century: Italian Opera Today

An International Conference • New York University
October 9-13, 2013 • Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò and the Humanities Initiative

As we approach the 200th anniversary of the birth of Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901), interest in his operas remains undiminished. Verdi’s music continues to travel around the world in live performances and recordings, and new technologies–from the internet to high-definition simulcasts—have made opera accessible to broader audiences. The international conference Verdi’s Third Century: Italian Opera Today will bring together scholars, practitioners, and critics at New York University to discuss the circulation and perception of Verdi—and of Italian opera—in today’s world. A principal focus will be how Verdi’s works have been interpreted, imagined, and appropriated.

A keynote lecture will be presented by Pulitzer Prize winner Garry Wills (Northwestern University). Philip Gossett (University of Chicago), general editor of the Works of Giuseppe Verdi, will deliver a position paper. Speakers and session chairs include over thirty scholars and opera practicioners from the United States and Europe.

Session themes include “Visual Aspects in the Opera House and Beyond,” “Verdi in Production,” “Singers,” “Analyzing Verdi,” “Framing Verdi: Opera and Twenty-First-Century Popular Culture,” “Scores and Editions in Today’s Opera House,” and “Reception, National Identity, and Monuments.”

Verdi’s Third Century: Italian Opera Today  is organized by the American Institute for Verdi Studies and hosted by two of NYU’s key organizations: Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò and the Humanities Initiative.  The program committee of Verdi’s Third Century: Italian Opera Today includes Suzanne Cusick (New York University), Francesco Izzo (University of Southampton and American Institute for Verdi Studies), Roberta M. Marvin (University of Iowa), Hilary Poriss (Northeastern University), Emilio Sala (University of Milan and Istituto Nazionale di Studi Verdiani), and Mary Ann Smart (University of California, Berkeley).

Support for Verdi’s Third Century: Italian Opera Today is provided by the American Institute for Verdi Studies, Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, the Humanities Initiative, the Department of Music, and the Office of the Dean for the Humanities.

View the full program here: http://www.nyu.edu/projects/verdi/conferenceprogram.html

Online registration for Verdi’s Third Century: Italian Opera Today is now closed.   In-person registration will open at 5pm on Wednesday, October 9 at Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò, were the first session of the conference takes place that evening.

The Expanded field and other more fragile states of mind

meltzer-lecture

Eve Meltzer reading from her new book, Systems We Have Loved: Conceptual Art, Affect, and the Antihumanist Turn (Univeristy of Chicago Press, 2013)

Thursday, October 10, 2013 at 6:30PM

Eve Meltzer is Associate Professor of Visual Studies at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study and an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Art History. Her first book, Systems We Have Loved: Conceptual Art, Affect, and the Antihumanist Turn (University of Chicago Press, 2013) situates the conceptual art movement in relation to the field of structuralist thought and offers a new framing for two of the most transformative movements of the 20th century and their common dream of the world as a total sign system.