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Featured Projects 2017

Humanities for STEM: Using Archives to Bridge the Two Cultures Divide

The two-year research collaborative, Humanities for STEM, focuses on how the study of primary sources, archival research, and associated methodologies of the humanities can be used to enhance the understanding of science (including medicine), technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Voices of New York – Renee Blake

Voices of New York is a project undertaken by Professor Renée Blake (in the Departments of Linguistics and Social & Cultural Analysis at New York University) and her undergraduate students (in the course The Language of America’s Ethnic Minorities). The goal of the project is to hear the voices of immigrant communities in New York City (NYC), and learn about the people behind them.

Featured Projects 2016

The Artist Archives Project – David Wojnarowicz

The Artist Archives Project develops information resources for the display and conservation of contemporary art. The initiative responds to a growing need for museum and archive professionals to work with artists in documenting their production methods, and building knowledge for future treatment and re-activation of their work.

Local Contexts 2.0: Implementing the Traditional Knowledge Labels

This project involves the development of a set of protocols, standards, tools, and resources relating to digital curation and stewardship of Indigenous cultural heritage that assists non-Native collecting institutions and local Native American communities to enhance access and management of knowledge about humanities collections.

Art & Politics in the City

Art & Politics in the City is a 3-semester, co-located, co-taught course led by Professor Alejandro Velasco in NY, and Florencia Malbran in Buenos Aires. Each semester, a (new) cohort of students investigates the correlation between street art and politics (electoral, cultural, economic, etc.) by using several pieces of technology to document, map, and analyze the graffiti in specific neighborhoods of NY and BA. Students are assigned a neighborhood and go out into the field to document the street art using a mobile data collection app called Fulcrum (fulcrumapp.com). The data from Fulcrum syncs to CartoDB, and from there students import public data to conduct their analyses, which includes spatial comparisons (NY to BA) and temporal comparisons across the several semesters. All of this work is showcased on a course site, using NYU Web Publishing. The course is now in its second semester, and students are in the process of generating their maps. I, Lillian Moran from GLI, and Andrew Battista from Data Services have been assisting with the technology this semester.

Interactive Pedagogy: Social Media Repurposing in Cinema Studies

This is a collaborative class project that analyzes the potential contributions of social networking tools to the documentation of personal moments in film history, and proposes an alternative, networked mode of film historiography. This experimental multimediated exploration aims to stimulate critical reflection on the complexities of documenting shared events and of conveying highly subjective cinematic experiences. The convergence of multiple means of capturing and remediating the ephemera of cinematic experiences provides new and innovative ideas on what it means to archive in the age of digital communications and social media.

Featured Projects Archive 2015

Identifying 3D Roman Portraits in the Classroom

Portraits of Roman Emperors and of members of their families were among the most accessible images for all members of Roman society. They were reproduced by the millions on coins and were common as portrait busts and full-length sculptures in urban and private settings. Since the Renaissance, scholars have used the fact that Roman coins name the Emperor under whose authority they were produced as one aide in identifying otherwise unnamed marble and bronze sculptures. Sebastian Heath of NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World is enabling his students to follow that same process.

The Victorian Lives and Letters Consortium

Founded in 2011, the Victorian Lives and Letters Consortium (VLLC) is a membership-based, not-for-profit organization composed of teachers, scholars, programmers, librarians, students, and enthusiasts devoted to the challenge of creating interactive digital archives of life-writing extending from the coronation of Queen Victoria to the outbreak of World War I.

Surfacing

Surfacing, a digital map of undersea cables, enables users to traverse the geographies of global network infrastructure. this online system, the user can dive into the photographic archives of cable routes, explore the local histories of cable stations and landing points, visit islands that have long been critical to transoceanic systems, and navigate the numerous connections between network

Sculpted Glyphs: Egypt and the Musée Charles X

Institute of Fine Arts PhD candidate Elizabeth Buhe’s ‘Sculpted Glyphs: Egypt and the Musée Charles X’ is a digital humanities article published in the online journal Nineteenth Century Art Worldwide (Spring 2014). The article presents a three-dimensional, high-resolution, and fully-navigable model of the Louvre’s first Egyptian museum, the Musée Charles X, which opened in 1827.

Print Disability and New Reading Formats

This project offers the first broad history of electronic reading technologies for blind and print-disabled people, and their co-evolution with mainstream reading practices. Beyond the introduction of new formats such as audiobooks and electronic books, print access efforts in the twentieth century gave rise to numerous technical innovations that transferred to other branches of electroacoustics and computing. Innovations in long-playing records, pitch-shifting with magnetic tape, scanning, optical character recognition (OCR), and synthetic speech ultimately retooled reading for both humans and machines.

Digital Experiments Group

Digital Experiments is a graduate-faculty working group in the Department of English at New York University. The group pursues a broad understanding of the intersection between digital tools and humanistic inquiry by engaging in collaborative practices of research, writing, and discussion. Taking a cue from Samuel Johnson’s definition of “experiment”—“The Trial of anything; something done in order to discover an uncertain or unknown effect”—we view our work as an investigation into how digital tools and practices can reshape literary studies today.

New York Scapes

NewYorkScapes is a research community exploring the application of concepts, tools, and resources in the digital humanities to the study of urban space. Through conversation and collaboration among scholars, archivists, artists, and activists, it seeks to facilitate the development of projects related to interpretation, curation, and communication of the documentary record of New York City, and projects engaging with the aesthetics, art, literature, design and other experiences of the city.

The Margaret Sanger Papers Project

The Margaret Sanger Papers Project, sponsored by NYU’s Division of Libraries, has gathered, identified and published a two-series 101-reel microfilm edition of Margaret Sanger’s papers (ProQuest, 1986-87), and is completing a four-volume book edition, the Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger, published by the University of Illinois Press. The Project’s mission is to educate the public about the history and impact of the birth control movement and one of America’s most important and intriguing social reformers.

Manifest; Supply Chain Platform

Manifest is a digital humanities platform and investigative toolkit for visualizing, analyzing, and documenting historic and contemporary supply chains, production lines, and trade networks. Intended for scholars and researchers exploring the history of assembly and distribution logistics in commodity manufacture and other forms of production, Manifest provides common data standards for supply chains while offering a publishing capability for spatial narratives leveraging geographic and statistical means of evaluation.

The English Channel

The English Channel is designed both as a site that showcases the activities of the NYU English department’s students and faculty in the areas or research, teaching, community building, and public humanities and as an environment that furthers those activities by activating the intersections among disparate fields of specialization.

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