Humanities Events at NYU | Sept. 25 – Oct. 8, 2017

A selection of upcoming events at NYU within the humanities


Decolonizing Vision Speaker Series: Apparatus of Power

Sept. 25, 2017, 6:00 PM
285 Mercer Street, 4th Floor

This talk will explore Shahzia Sikander’s pioneering practice that takes classical Indo-Persian miniature painting as its point of departure and challenges the strict formal tropes of the genre by experimenting with scale and various forms of new media.

Co-Sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality; Department of Art & Art Professions; Department of Art History; Institute of Fine Arts; Program in Asian/Pacific/American Studies; Program in Gender & Sexuality Studies; and SouthAsiaNYU; and by South Asian Women’s Creative Collective (SAWCC).


Discussing ‘Assembly’ with Michael Hardt

Sept. 25, 2017, 12:30 PM
20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor Conference Room

A discussion of Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s book Assembly, and how current large-scale horizontal movements can develop the capacities for political strategy and decision-making to effect lasting and democratic change.

Sponsored by Urban Democracy Lab, Urban Humanities Collaborative, NYU American Studies, and NYU Metropolitan Studies.


Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress & the Rise of Militant Civil Rights

September 26, 2017, 4:30 PM
70 Washington Square South, Room 10-03

Erik Gellman (Roosevelt University) will discuss his new book Death Blow to Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress and the Rise of Militant Civil Rights.

Sponsored by the Tamiment Library.


A Romp Through NYU’s Architecture, Built and Unbuilt

September 26, 2017, 6:30 PM
32 Waverly Place, Room 300

Carol Krinsky (NYU) will survey the wide range of buildings created or adapted for use by generations of students. From the original Gothic Revival building of 1831 to classicism, Arts-and-Crafts, and Art Deco to late modernism—including Philip Johnson’s Bobst Library and proposed campus master plan—she will illuminate NYU’s panorama of architectural forms.

Co-sponsored by NYU’s Department of Art History and Grey Art Gallery.


Pissed

Sept. 26, 2017, 7:00 PM
Performance Studies Studio, Room 612, 721 Broadway

 A panel & conversation  about art, architecture and legal action as tactics for promoting inclusivity, with Cassils, Jack Halberstam, Titus Kaphar, Joel Sanders, and Chase Strangio.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality and Department of Performance Studies.


HemiPress Celebration

Sept. 27, 2017, 6:00 PM
Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, 20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor

Please join Hemi as they celebrate their 2017 Award for Excellence in Digital Scholarship, awarded by the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) and the American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR). They will also be celebrating the release of their most recent publications.

Sponsored by the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics.


German Civilians and Downed Allied Airmen in World War II: From Civility to Lynching 

September 27, 2017, 6:30 PM
16 Washington Mews

During World War II, the way civilians treated downed airmen said a good deal about wartime societies. In Germany, civilians’ behaviour became violent toward downed airmen when state policy, popular culture, and ideology started aligning. Several hundreds of allied airmen were lynched between 1943 and 1945. This presentation draws on statistics and a particular case of lynching.

Sponsored by the Institute of French Studies.


Music, Civil Defense and Shelter Anxiety in Cold War American Television

September 28, 2017, 4:00 PM
70 Washington Square South, 10th Floor, Michael Quill Conference Room

As part of the Fall 2017 Cold War Center Seminar Series, Reba Wissner (NYU) will discuss “Music, Civil Defense and Shelter Anxiety in Cold War American Television” on Thursday, September 28. Sara Fieldston (Seton Hall University) will comment.

Sponsored by the Center for the United States and the Cold War.


Screening: Talking Black in America

Sept. 28, 2017, 6:30 PM
Cantor Film Center, Theater 102, 36 East 8th Street

A one-hour film screening of Talking Black in America, followed by discussion with scholars and activists.

Hosted by NYU School of Professional Studies: Dialogues in Languages and Humanities, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis (SCA), Africana Studies and the Department of Linguistics.


Reimagining Borders and Boundaries Within a Globalized World

Sept. 28-29, 2017
NYU Center for the Humanities, 20 Cooper Square, 5th Floor & Fiterman Hall at Borough of Manhattan Community College, 245 Greenwich Street

A symposium organized by the NEH-funded Cultivating Global Competencies in a Diverse World Program at Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC).

Sponsored by National Endowment for the Humanities, NYU Center for Humanities, as well as the Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship (CETLS) at BMCC.


Eastern Iran and Western Central Asia during Late Antiquity (3rd-5th cent. CE)

September 29, 2017, 9:00 AM
ISAW Lecture Hall, 15 East 84th St

The primary goal of this one-day workshop is therefore to improve the dialogue across what are key disciplines for the study of Eastern Iran and Western Central Asia during Late Antiquity, with a regional focus on Bactria/Tokharistan and Western Sogdiana.

Co-sponsored by ISAW, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and the Chicago Initiative for Global Late Antiquity.


Alchemy: Its Theory and Practice 

September 29, 2017, 12:30 PM
14 University Place

Alchemy is the art and science of bringing something to its final perfection, or its completion – much as a work of art is completed or perfected. At heart it is about creation, creator, and creativity. Brian Cotnoir’s talk will be an essential introduction to the theories and practices of alchemy and how it relates to creation and another way of knowing.

Sponsored by the Center for the Experimental Humanities.


Kaufmann and Fassbinder, Brecht and Simone, and “Black Performance on the Outskirts of the Left”

October 2, 2017, 6:30 PM
42 Washington Mews

A conversation between scholars Tina Campt and Joshua Chambers-Letson who will join Malik Gaines to discuss his new book, Black Performance on the Outskirts of the Left: A History of the Impossible. In this transnational study, Gaines explores the legacies of leftist theater in performances of the 1960s.

Sponsored by Deutsches Haus at NYU.


The Great Nadar

October 3, 2017, 7:00 PM
16 Washington Mews

Adam Begley, author of The Great Nadar: The Man Behind the Camera will speak about that larger-than-life figure, a visionary whose outsized talent and canny self-promotion put him way ahead of his time. Nadar was the first great portrait photographer, a pioneering balloonist, the first person to take an aerial photograph, and the prime mover behind the first airmail service, Nadar was one of the original celebrity artist-entrepreneurs.


Not Just Rights, but Duties: Mexico and the New International Economic Order

October 5, 2017, 4:00 PM
70 Washington Square South, 10th Floor, Michael Quill Conference Room

As part of the Fall 2017 Cold War Center Seminar Series, Christy Thorton (John Hopkins University) will discuss “Not Just Rights, but Duties: Mexico and the New International Economic Order” on Thursday, October 5. Christopher Dietrich (Fordham University) will comment.

Sponsored by the Center for the United States and the Cold War.


In the Solitude of the Cotton Fields

October 5, 2017, 7:30 PM & October 8, 2017, 3:00 PM
NYU Kimmel Center Grand Staircase

In the Solitude of the Cotton Fields is a modern French classic by playwright Bernard-Marie Koltès (1948-89) that portrays the relationship between a dealer and a client. As directed by the innovative French director and sound artist Roland Auzet, in a new English translation by NYU’s Judith Graves Miller, is an intense transaction between conflicting desires for drugs, love, connection, and a sense of existence.

Co-sponsored by the Department of NYU Tisch Dance and the Department of NYU Steinhardt Educational Theatre.


Recognizing Syphilis: Medical Knowledge and the Politics of Explanation

October 5, 2017, 6:30 PM
42 Washington Mews

A talk by professor Monika Pietrzak-Franger (DAAD Visiting Scholar, University of Hamburg) exploring the tensions between invisibility and visibility as characteristic of the late nineteenth century representation of syphilis. The talk will also focus on the power dynamics underlying various acts of syphilis recognition.

Co-sponsored by Deutsches Haus at NYU and DAAD.

Image provided by Sariah Bunker