Events Archive

An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction

Date: February 13, 2018

How does the literature and culture of early Victorian Britain look different if viewed from below? The flourishing radical press was home to daring literary experiments that embraced themes including empire and economic inequality, helping to shape mainstream literature. What emerges is a new vision of Victorian social life, in which fierce debates and surprising exchanges spanned the class divide.

Join us for a panel discussion on Greg Vargo's An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction: Chartism, Radical Print Culture, and the Social Problem Novel, a book that challenges long-held assumptions about the cultural separation between the “two nations” of rich and poor in the Victorian era.

Comments on the book will be offered by panelists, followed by hands-on letterpress printing on a platen press. Print your own postcard commemorating the release of An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction, using nineteenth-century printing technology.  Participants include:

Lauren Goodlad
Professor, Department of English, Rutgers University

Anne Humpherys
Professor, Department of English, Lehman College

MC Hyland
PhD Candidate, Department of English, NYU

Greg Vargo (author)
Assistant Professor, Department of English, NYU

Moderated by Jonathan Franklin, PhD Candidate, Department of English, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Freud’s Trip to Orvieto

Date: January 30, 2018

Italian Renaissance painting, almost more than anything else Freud experienced in his daily life, brought on some of his most intense personal reactions. This event will focus on Freud's letters and little-known reflections on art he saw in the early years of his life, more than his better-known psychoanalytic approach to the lives and work of Leonardo Da Vinci and others.

In particular, the discussants will evoke pictures by Titian, Botticelli, and Luca Signorelli, all of which deeply moved Freud, as well as his analysis of the Hans Holbein painting he saw in Dresden. They will also take a look at Meyer Shapiro’s views on Freud’s experience of, and writing about, art.

A discussion with:

Kent Minturn
Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU

Nicholas Fox Weber
Director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation

Moderated by Pepe Karmel
Associate Professor of Art History, Department of Art History, NYU

We will also be celebrating Nicholas Fox Weber's recent book, Freud’s Trip to Orvieto: The Great Doctor’s Unresolved Confrontation with Antisemitism, Death, and Homoeroticism; his Passion for Paintings; and the Writer in His Footsteps (Bellevue Literary Press, 2017).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Jumpstart Your Winter Writing

Date: December 19, 2017

Join us for an action-oriented session on how to kick-off and sustain your winter writing and how to make significant progress on your writing project. Get practical advice on making this winter count!

Ulrich Baer
Vice Provost for Faculty and Undergraduate Academic Affairs; Professor, Department of German, New York University

Susan Ferber
Executive Editor, Oxford University Press

Theresa MacPhail
Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, Stevens Institute of Technology

Pamela Newkirk
Professor, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


How to Start Your Humanities Research Project

Date: December 12, 2017

What does it mean to study the humanities and how do you go about conducting undergraduate research? Join the conversation with a roundtable of fellow undergraduate students, who will share about their own research projects and experiences. Plus, learn about summer research opportunities that can prepare you to apply for doctoral study in the humanities.

Lunch will be provided.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Empress of the East

Date: December 5, 2017

A discussion of Leslie Peirce’s new book, Empress of the East, the life story of Roxelana (Hurrem in Turkish), beloved concubine of Suleyman the Magnificent and the only queen the Ottomans ever knew. Challenging the persistent view that Roxelana’s scheming undermined the empire, the book argues that the changes she and Suleyman wrought instead strengthened the dynastic regime. Roxelana’s most consequential accomplishment was the aggrandizement of the imperial harem’s political stature. The book hopes to move the history of sixteenth-century women rulers eastward, geographically beyond what the traditional narrative tells us about female power. The panel brings perspectives from outside the empire as well as from later Ottoman times.

Lale Can
Assistant Professor of History, City College, CUNY

Leslie Peirce
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Jane Tylus
Professor of Italian, Comparative Literature, NYU

Larry Wolff
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States