Great New Books in the Humanities

Bright Signals: A History of Color Television

Date: September 25, 2018

In Bright Signals, Susan Murray explores an over forty-year history of the technological, aesthetic, industrial, and cultural development of color television, which was imagined and sold as a new way of seeing, an ideal form of modern American consumer vision that promised a spectacular send of proximity and immersion. She argues that color television was an incredibly complex technology of visual culture that reframed the very idea of television, while also revealing deep tensions and aspirations about technology’s relationship to and perspective on the “natural” world and, relatedly, our potential to extend human sight and experience. Join us to celebrate the book’s release and and an in-depth discussion with the author.

Featuring Susan Murray (Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, the author of Hitch Your Antenna to the Stars: Early Television and Broadcast Stardom, and the coeditor of Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture.)

Co-sponsored by the NYU Department of Media, Culture, and Communication.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


James Baldwin's Story of Childhood: A Symposium

Date: September 11, 2018

Join us for the launch event for a new edition of James Baldwin’s book, Little Man, Little Man: A Story of Childhood (Duke University Press) featuring a panel of scholars, archivists, and contributors, including Baldwin’s nephew Tejan Karefa-Smart and his niece Aisha Karefa-Smart. Hosted by the book's co-editors Nicholas Boggs (Department of English, NYU) and Jennifer DeVere Brody (Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Stanford).

Aisha Karefa-Smart
Author and Educator

Tejan Karefa-Smart
Photographer and Digital Media Artist

Steven Fullwood
Independent Archivist and Curator

Dagmawi Woubshet
Ahuja Family Presidential Associate Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania

Moderated by Sybil Cooksey, Clinical Assistant Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Humanities and the NYU Department of English. Reception to follow.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Writing Human Rights: The Political Imaginaries of Writers of Color

Date: March 20, 2018

Crystal Parikh's Writing Human Rights: The Political Imaginaries of Writers of Color contends that unlike humanitarianism, which views its objects as victims, human rights provide avenues for the creation of political subjects. Join us for a panel discussion, with the author, exploring how the book illuminates a human rights critique of idealized American rights and freedoms that have been globalized in the twenty-first century. Participants include:

Lisa Duggan
Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

Jeffrey Flynn
Associate Professor, Philosophy Department, Fordham University

Crystal Parikh (author)
Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, Asian/Pacific/American Institute, NYU

Moderated by Cristina Beltran, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction

Date: February 13, 2018

How does the literature and culture of early Victorian Britain look different if viewed from below? The flourishing radical press was home to daring literary experiments that embraced themes including empire and economic inequality, helping to shape mainstream literature. What emerges is a new vision of Victorian social life, in which fierce debates and surprising exchanges spanned the class divide.

Join us for a panel discussion on Greg Vargo's An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction: Chartism, Radical Print Culture, and the Social Problem Novel, a book that challenges long-held assumptions about the cultural separation between the “two nations” of rich and poor in the Victorian era.

Comments on the book will be offered by panelists, followed by hands-on letterpress printing on a platen press. Print your own postcard commemorating the release of An Underground History of Early Victorian Fiction, using nineteenth-century printing technology.  Participants include:

Lauren Goodlad
Professor, Department of English, Rutgers University

Anne Humpherys
Professor, Department of English, Lehman College

MC Hyland
PhD Candidate, Department of English, NYU

Greg Vargo (author)
Assistant Professor, Department of English, NYU

Moderated by Jonathan Franklin, PhD Candidate, Department of English, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Freud’s Trip to Orvieto

Date: January 30, 2018

Italian Renaissance painting, almost more than anything else Freud experienced in his daily life, brought on some of his most intense personal reactions. This event will focus on Freud's letters and little-known reflections on art he saw in the early years of his life, more than his better-known psychoanalytic approach to the lives and work of Leonardo Da Vinci and others.

In particular, the discussants will evoke pictures by Titian, Botticelli, and Luca Signorelli, all of which deeply moved Freud, as well as his analysis of the Hans Holbein painting he saw in Dresden. They will also take a look at Meyer Shapiro’s views on Freud’s experience of, and writing about, art.

A discussion with:

Kent Minturn
Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU

Nicholas Fox Weber
Director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation

Moderated by Pepe Karmel
Associate Professor of Art History, Department of Art History, NYU

We will also be celebrating Nicholas Fox Weber's recent book, Freud’s Trip to Orvieto: The Great Doctor’s Unresolved Confrontation with Antisemitism, Death, and Homoeroticism; his Passion for Paintings; and the Writer in His Footsteps (Bellevue Literary Press, 2017).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States