Queer Encoding: Encoding Diverse Identities

Date: April 28, 2017

How can the practice of digitization better respond to, and represent, geographically, culturally and otherwise, diverse textual identities? Come and hear leading practitioners in the field talk about how we might work creatively with mark-up languages to be more inclusive, and see strategies in action in the Project Hack.

Schedule:

  • 10:30AM — Introduction: What is TEI and why might I be interested? by Peter Logan (Professor of English and Academic Director of the Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University) and Marion Thain (Associate Director of Digital Humanities, New York University)
  • 11:00AM — Morning Keynote: Using TEI to Encode the History of Chinese Buddhism by Marcus Bingenheimer (Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, Temple University)
  • 12:30PM – Lunch
  • 1:30PM — Afternoon Keynote: Encoding Identity by Julia Flanders (Digital Scholarship Group Director and Professor of the Practice of English, Northeastern University)
  • 3:00PM — Afternoon Break
  • 3:15 - 5:00 PM — Project Hack: Queer Encoding in Action! & Closing Remarks
    • Queerness of Space Time and Text in the Independent Crusaders Mapping Project by Katherine Briant and Stephen Powell (Fordham University, MA Center for Medieval Studies)
    • Queer Encoding Challenges in The Making and Knowing Project by Sohini Chattopadhyay and Benjamin Hiebert (Columbia University)
    • Queer Encoding and Identity Formation in the Nineteenth-Century Manuscript Diary by Cherrie Kwok and Nicole Cote (New York University)

Program Partners:

  • NYU Digital Humanities
  • Fordham Digital Humanities Group, and Office of Research
  • Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Theorizing Sound Writing

Date: May 2, 2017

What promise does sound knowledge hold for cultural analysis? How might we not only write sound but sound theory differently? In addressing these concerns, the authors in Theorizing Sound Writing also make an intervention into the ethics of academic knowledge, one in which listening is the first step not only in translating sound into words, but in compassionate scholarship. As a method of inquiry, both listening and sound writing expand not only what is known but also how we come to know (and be) as public intellectuals and artisans of sounded, vibrating worlds.

Participants include:

  • Deborah Kapchan — Associate Professor of Performance Studies, New York University
  • J. Martin Daughtry — Associate Professor of Music, New York University
  • Carol Muller — Professor of Music, University of Pennsylvania
  • Tomie Hahn — Associate Professor of Performance Ethnology; Director, Center for Deep Listening, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Alex Waterman — Musician; Scholar; Author

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Jumpstart Your Summer Writing

Date: May 9, 2017

There are over 100 days between the last day of the spring semester and the first day of the fall semester. Use this time to make progress on your writing project! Join us for an action-oriented session. Panelists will discuss how to kick-off your summer writing and how to approach editors about publishing your work.

  • Ulrich Baer — Vice Provost, New York University
  • Pamela Newkirk — Professor of Journalism & Director of Undergraduate Students, Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, New York University
  • Eric Zinner — Associate Director & Editor-in-Chief, NYU Press

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States