Global Humanities Series

Jumpstart Your Summer Writing

Date: May 9, 2018

There are over 100 days between the last day of the spring semester and the first day of the fall semester. Use this time to make progress on your writing project! Join us for an action-oriented session. Panelists will discuss how to kick-off your summer writing and how to approach editors about publishing your work.

Ulrich Baer
Vice Provost for Faculty and Undergraduate Academic Affairs; Professor, Department of German, New York University

Susan Ferber
Executive Editor, Oxford University Press

Theresa MacPhail
Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, Stevens Institute of Technology

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Listening to History

Date: April 17, 2018

How do we make oral histories more accessible to a public audience? This round-table convenes activists and historians from different fields to discuss their projects in presenting oral histories through podcasts and exhibits, crafting coherent narratives out of exciting but often unwieldy sources. What audiences can these publicly-minded initiatives incorporate? How do the demands of narrative structure these histories? What are the promises and pitfalls of such an approach? Panelists include:

Cynthia Tobar 
Welfare Rights Initiative Oral History Project; Cities for People, Not for Profit: Gentrification & Housing Activism in Bushwick

Cassie Wagler 
NYC Trans Oral History Project

Christine Mladic Janney
Public Humanities Fellow, NYU

Moderated by Joan Flores-Villalobos, Ph.D. Candidate, African Diaspora History, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Writing Human Rights: The Political Imaginaries of Writers of Color

Date: March 20, 2018

Crystal Parikh's Writing Human Rights: The Political Imaginaries of Writers of Color contends that unlike humanitarianism, which views its objects as victims, human rights provide avenues for the creation of political subjects. Join us for a panel discussion, with the author, exploring how the book illuminates a human rights critique of idealized American rights and freedoms that have been globalized in the twenty-first century. Participants include:

Lisa Duggan
Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

Jeffrey Flynn
Associate Professor, Philosophy Department, Fordham University

Crystal Parikh (author)
Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, Asian/Pacific/American Institute, NYU

Moderated by Cristina Beltran, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Freud’s Trip to Orvieto

Date: January 30, 2018

Italian Renaissance painting, almost more than anything else Freud experienced in his daily life, brought on some of his most intense personal reactions. This event will focus on Freud's letters and little-known reflections on art he saw in the early years of his life, more than his better-known psychoanalytic approach to the lives and work of Leonardo Da Vinci and others.

In particular, the discussants will evoke pictures by Titian, Botticelli, and Luca Signorelli, all of which deeply moved Freud, as well as his analysis of the Hans Holbein painting he saw in Dresden. They will also take a look at Meyer Shapiro’s views on Freud’s experience of, and writing about, art.

A discussion with:

Kent Minturn
Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU

Nicholas Fox Weber
Director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation

Moderated by Pepe Karmel
Associate Professor of Art History, Department of Art History, NYU

We will also be celebrating Nicholas Fox Weber's recent book, Freud’s Trip to Orvieto: The Great Doctor’s Unresolved Confrontation with Antisemitism, Death, and Homoeroticism; his Passion for Paintings; and the Writer in His Footsteps (Bellevue Literary Press, 2017).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Empress of the East

Date: December 5, 2017

A discussion of Leslie Peirce’s new book, Empress of the East, the life story of Roxelana (Hurrem in Turkish), beloved concubine of Suleyman the Magnificent and the only queen the Ottomans ever knew. Challenging the persistent view that Roxelana’s scheming undermined the empire, the book argues that the changes she and Suleyman wrought instead strengthened the dynastic regime. Roxelana’s most consequential accomplishment was the aggrandizement of the imperial harem’s political stature. The book hopes to move the history of sixteenth-century women rulers eastward, geographically beyond what the traditional narrative tells us about female power. The panel brings perspectives from outside the empire as well as from later Ottoman times.

Lale Can
Assistant Professor of History, City College, CUNY

Leslie Peirce
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Jane Tylus
Professor of Italian, Comparative Literature, NYU

Larry Wolff
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States