Global Humanities Series

Japan, North Korea and Abduction: A discussion of Robert S. Boynton's "The Invitation-Only Zone"

Date: February 28, 2017

Join us for a discussion that unearths what was once considered an urban myth, the secretive North Korean abductions of Japanese citizens between 1977 and 1983. Discover these citizens' stories, somehow too strange to be believed as true, and how they shaped the relationships between two nations.

North Korea abducted dozens of Japanese citizens in the late nineteen-seventies and held them, in secret, for decades. In 2002, after years of denying any role in the abductions, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il met with Japanese prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, and confessed the state's role in the hope that doing so would bring economic aid from Japan. The meeting had the opposite effect and the abductions remain one of the most pressing issues in Japan and Northeast Asia. In "The Invitation-Only Zone," Robert S. Boynton tells the story of the abductions, using the events to explore the history of Japanese-Korean relations.

Panelists include:

  • Carol Gluck, George Sansom Professor of History Chair, Committee on Global Thought Weatherhead East Asian Institute/Columbia University
  • Robert Boynton, Associate Professor, New York University
  • Charles K. Armstrong, The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, Columbia University

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Ports, Foods, and Connectivities Across the Indian Ocean

Date: February 14, 2017

Travels on the monsoon among countless connected ports around the Indian Ocean and western Pacific formed spaces of mobility connecting East Asia with Southeast, South and West Asia, from ancient times. Seaborne mobility by migrants, merchants, warriors, and cultural activists shaped all of Asia for many centuries before it brought Europeans and launched global modernity. Subsequently, modern industrial infrastructure -- railways, steam ships, and deep-sea ports – further integrated this maritime region, leading to intensified circulations of people, goods, ideas, and tastes.

This panel examines two aspects of Indian Ocean connections. First, it examines the environmental, political, and economic reasons for the emergence of new ports. Second, it focuses on the circulations and mixing of food ingredients, food habits, and culinary tastes as examples of connectivities across the maritime spaces.

Brief talks will be presented and discussed by the following panelists.

  • “How New Ports Emerge? The Cases of Cochin and Malacca” by Tansen Sen, Professor of History, Baruch College, CUNY
  • “Bad Habits and Good Taste: Unconventional Circulations” by Krishnendu Ray, Professor and Chair, Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, New York University
  • “Kapitan Chicken: Materialized Maritime Connections in Nyonya Cuisine” by Mareike Pampus, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

The panel discussion will be moderated by David Ludden, Professor and Chair, Department of History, New York University.

Co-sponsored by NYU's Center for Global Asia.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Perspectives on the Holocaust in the Postwar Era

Date: February 8, 2017

Join us for an insightful talk on how and why American Jews in the decade or so after the end of WWII engaged with the memory of the Holocaust. Hasia Diner is the author of We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence after the Holocaust, 1945-1962 (NYU Press). This event is offered in conjunction with "Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965," on view at NYU's Grey Art Gallery until April 1. The exhibition includes works by Boris Lurie, a survivor of Buchenwald who emigrated to New York and founded the March Group of artists, who employed art as tool for making polemical statements about the Holocaust and other issues.

Talk by Hasia Diner, Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History; Director, Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History, New York University

Co-sponsored by Grey Art Gallery.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Great New Books in the Humanities: The Singing Turk

Date: November 9, 2016

Join us for a discussion about Larry Wolff’s new book, The Singing Turk, about 18th-century operas and understanding this cultural phenomenon in the context of European-Ottoman relations. This book is about the huge repertory of (mostly now forgotten) operas about Turks that were performed during the long 18th century (from the 1680s to the 1820s), including works by Handel, Rameau, Gluck, Haydn, Mozart, and Rossini, as well as many other less well known composers. The discussion will consider what the figure of the singing Turk meant in European Enlightenment culture, and, more generally, how such operas may be considered in the context of the Christian-Muslim encounter in European history. This is event is co-sponsored with the NYU Center for the Ballet and the Arts.

This event will include the live performance of "Singing Turk" music by Mozart and Rossini, performed by basso David Salsbery Fry and soprano Joanna Curtis, accompanied by Michael Beckerman at the piano.

Larry Wolff
Silver Professor of History, Director, Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, NYU

Leslie Peirce
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Michael Beckerman
Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Music, NYU

Event Location:
Center for Ballet and the Arts
16 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003


Race, Racism and Xenophobia in a Global Context II

Date: October 28, 2016

How does racism and discrimination operate in different geographical contexts, reflecting local tensions and prejudices and intersecting with issues of nationality, class, gender, religion, marginality, citizenship, and globalization?

How does location affect the way in which we think about the social constructions of race and race relations?

What role do historical experiences of slavery, discrimination and colonialism play?

How does the current migration crisis in Europe and rising Islamophobia help us better understand the similarities and differences between the U.S. and Europe?

Following last spring’s successful ‘Teach-In’ at NYU Florence, La Pietra Dialogues is bringing its ‘R2X’ dialogue to New York, with the support of the NYU Florence R2X student team and featuring scholars, artists, and activists from across NYU.

What can we gain from a transatlantic reflection on these issues?

To learn more about this event, visit La Pietra Dialogues.

View the program.

Event Location:
Hemmerdinger Hall, Silver Center
31 Washington Place
New York, NY
10012