Global Humanities Series

Empress of the East

Date: December 5, 2017

A discussion of Leslie Peirce’s new book, Empress of the East, the life story of Roxelana (Hurrem in Turkish), beloved concubine of Suleyman the Magnificent and the only queen the Ottomans ever knew. Challenging the persistent view that Roxelana’s scheming undermined the empire, the book argues that the changes she and Suleyman wrought instead strengthened the dynastic regime. Roxelana’s most consequential accomplishment was the aggrandizement of the imperial harem’s political stature. The book hopes to move the history of sixteenth-century women rulers eastward, geographically beyond what the traditional narrative tells us about female power. The panel brings perspectives from outside the empire as well as from later Ottoman times.

Lale Can
Assistant Professor of History, City College, CUNY

Leslie Peirce
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Jane Tylus
Professor of Italian, Comparative Literature, NYU

Larry Wolff
Silver Professor of History, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


The Great Woman Singer: Gender and Voice in Puerto Rican Music

Date: October 17, 2017

Join us for a panel discussion of Licia Fiol-Matta's new book, The Great Woman Singer: Gender and Voice in Puerto Rican Music. Panelists will engage the book's central concept of "the thinking voice" as a practice of listening, discussing voice as a "full emptiness": a performed gap out of sync with gender and genre. Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.

Licia Fiol-Matta
Professor, Spanish & Portuguese, NYU

Gayatri Gopinath
Associate Professor of Social & Cultural Analysis, NYU

Jack Halberstam
Professor of Gender Studies and English, Columbia University

Fred Moten
Professor of Performance Studies, NYU

Rubén Ríos Ávila
Professor of Spanish & Portuguese, NYU

Alexandra Vazquez
Associate Professor of Performance Studies, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Japan, North Korea and Abduction: A discussion of Robert S. Boynton's "The Invitation-Only Zone"

Date: February 28, 2017

Join us for a discussion that unearths what was once considered an urban myth, the secretive North Korean abductions of Japanese citizens between 1977 and 1983. Discover these citizens' stories, somehow too strange to be believed as true, and how they shaped the relationships between two nations.

North Korea abducted dozens of Japanese citizens in the late nineteen-seventies and held them, in secret, for decades. In 2002, after years of denying any role in the abductions, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il met with Japanese prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, and confessed the state's role in the hope that doing so would bring economic aid from Japan. The meeting had the opposite effect and the abductions remain one of the most pressing issues in Japan and Northeast Asia. In "The Invitation-Only Zone," Robert S. Boynton tells the story of the abductions, using the events to explore the history of Japanese-Korean relations.

Panelists include:

  • Carol Gluck, George Sansom Professor of History Chair, Committee on Global Thought Weatherhead East Asian Institute/Columbia University
  • Robert Boynton, Associate Professor, New York University
  • Charles K. Armstrong, The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, Columbia University

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Ports, Foods, and Connectivities Across the Indian Ocean

Date: February 14, 2017

Travels on the monsoon among countless connected ports around the Indian Ocean and western Pacific formed spaces of mobility connecting East Asia with Southeast, South and West Asia, from ancient times. Seaborne mobility by migrants, merchants, warriors, and cultural activists shaped all of Asia for many centuries before it brought Europeans and launched global modernity. Subsequently, modern industrial infrastructure -- railways, steam ships, and deep-sea ports – further integrated this maritime region, leading to intensified circulations of people, goods, ideas, and tastes.

This panel examines two aspects of Indian Ocean connections. First, it examines the environmental, political, and economic reasons for the emergence of new ports. Second, it focuses on the circulations and mixing of food ingredients, food habits, and culinary tastes as examples of connectivities across the maritime spaces.

Brief talks will be presented and discussed by the following panelists.

  • “How New Ports Emerge? The Cases of Cochin and Malacca” by Tansen Sen, Professor of History, Baruch College, CUNY
  • “Bad Habits and Good Taste: Unconventional Circulations” by Krishnendu Ray, Professor and Chair, Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, New York University
  • “Kapitan Chicken: Materialized Maritime Connections in Nyonya Cuisine” by Mareike Pampus, PhD Candidate, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

The panel discussion will be moderated by David Ludden, Professor and Chair, Department of History, New York University.

Co-sponsored by NYU's Center for Global Asia.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Perspectives on the Holocaust in the Postwar Era

Date: February 8, 2017

Join us for an insightful talk on how and why American Jews in the decade or so after the end of WWII engaged with the memory of the Holocaust. Hasia Diner is the author of We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence after the Holocaust, 1945-1962 (NYU Press). This event is offered in conjunction with "Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965," on view at NYU's Grey Art Gallery until April 1. The exhibition includes works by Boris Lurie, a survivor of Buchenwald who emigrated to New York and founded the March Group of artists, who employed art as tool for making polemical statements about the Holocaust and other issues.

Talk by Hasia Diner, Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History; Director, Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History, New York University

Co-sponsored by Grey Art Gallery.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States