Faculty Fellows 2016-2017

Sebastián Calderón Bentin
Assistant Professor
Department of Drama, Tisch

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Project: States of Illusion: Performance, Media, and Politics in Contemporary Latin America

Sebastián Calderón Bentin is a theater artist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Drama at New York University. His research interests include performance theory, mass media, theories of the baroque and Latin American cultural studies. His writings have appeared in the journals TDR, Identities, and Istmo as well as book anthologies such as Neoliberalism and Global Theaters (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012) and Support Networks (University of Chicago Press, 2015). His current book project, The Politics of (Dis)illusion, explores the effects of new video technologies on the relationship between illusion and power in contemporary Latin American politics. He has been a visiting teacher at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at New York University, the Teatro de la Universidad Católica in Peru and the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics where he is an Associate Faculty member.


Chanda Laine Carey
Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow
Department of Art History, FAS

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academia.edu

Project: Embodying the Sacred: Marina Abramović, Transcultural Aesthetics and the Global Geography of Art

Chanda Laine Carey is the Andrew W. Mellon Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for the Humanities. Her research and focuses on the transcultural aesthetics of Contemporary art in global context, with an emphasis on artists whose practices reflect the diversity of transnational cultural geographies. She holds a PhD in Art History, Theory and Criticism from the University of California at San Diego, and MA in Theory and Criticism from Art Center College of Design, and a BA an Art History and Criticism from the University of California at San Diego. Chanda is a member of the Yale Bouchet Honor Society, and her research has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the European Science Foundation, the Max and Iris Stern International Symposia, and the Société Européene pour l’Astronomie dans la Culture.


Toby Lee
Assistant Professor
Department of Cinema Studies, Tisch

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Project: Cultural Crisis, Cultural Citizenship: The Thessaloniki International Film Festival

Toby Lee is an artist, anthropologist, and Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Her research interests include visual and media anthropology, the anthropology of cultural institutions, cultural citizenship, expanded documentary, and cultures of surveillance and documentation. She works across video, installation, performance and drawing, and her work has been been exhibited at the Locarno Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, Museum of the Moving Image (NYC), and the 2014 Whitney Biennial. She has a PhD in Anthropology and Film & Visual Studies from Harvard University, where she was a member of the Sensory Ethnography Lab. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the Film Study Center at Harvard University, and the Flaherty Film Seminar.


Elisha Russ-Fishbane
Assistant Professor
Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, FAS

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Project: Cultures of Aging in the Medieval Jewish Mediterranean

Elisha Russ-Fishbane, Assistant Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, is a historian of Jewish life and culture in the Islamic world, including the religious and intellectual intersections of Judaism and Islam. He is the author of a book on the Jewish-Sufi movement of thirteenth-century Egypt, entitled Judaism, Sufism, and the Pietists of Medieval Egypt: A Study of Abraham Maimonides and His Circle (Oxford University Press, 2015). He is currently working on a book on the experience and perception of aging in the medieval Jewish communities of the Mediterranean basin. Major topics the book explores include familial and communal support networks, divergent experiences of older men and women, physiological changes in light of medieval medicine, ethical and legal duties for the treatment of the old, and paradigms of aging in Jewish thought and Hebrew literature.


George Shulman
Professor
Gallatin

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Project: Postmortem Effects: Theorizing (Beyond) Impasse

George Shulman teaches political theory and American Studies at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study. He has published three books, Radicalism and Reverence: The Political Thought of Gerrard Winstanley; American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Politics; and, with Romand Coles and Mark Reinhardt, Radicals Futures Past: Essays in Contemporary Political Thought. He has written extensively about the political theory canon, contemporary political thought, and political theology on the one hand, and about American literature and politics with a focus on issues of race.


Nicole Starosielski
Assistant Professor
Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, Steinhardt

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Project: Media Hot and Cold

Nicole Starosielski is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication. She is author of The Undersea Network (Duke University Press, 2015), which charts the development of transoceanic cable systems, beginning with the nineteenth century telegraph network and extending to today’s fiber-optic infrastructure. She is also co-editor of Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructure (University of Illinois Press, 2015) and Sustainable Media: Critical Approaches to Media and Environment (Routledge, 2016). Her current project, Media Hot and Cold, traces the relationship between media technologies, embodied perception, and thermal conditions.


Marita Sturken
Professor
Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, Steinhardt

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Project: Architectures of Memory and Defense: American Empire and Post-9/11 Visual Culture

Marita Sturken is Professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, where she teaches courses in visual culture, cultural memory, and consumerism. Her current research focuses on the visual culture of empire in post-9/11 American culture, looking at the cultural memory of 9/11 and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in relation to the post-9/11 visuality of security, defense, detention, and drone wars. She is the author of Tangled Memories: The Vietnam War, the AIDS Epidemic, and the Politics of Remembering (1997), and Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture (with Lisa Cartwright, Third Edition forthcoming 2017), and Tourists of History: Memory, Kitsch, and Consumerism From Oklahoma City to Ground Zero (2007). She was the editor of American Quarterly from 2003-2006.