Fellows, 2015-2016

at the NYU Center for the Humanities

Narges Bajoghli

Narges Bajoghli

Doctoral Student Fellow; Doctoral Student, Department of Anthropology, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Narges Bajoghli is a PhD candidate in socio-cultural Anthropology at New York University and a documentary filmmaker in NYU’s Culture and Media Program. Narges’ research focuses on pro-regime cultural producers in Iran, and is supported by dissertation research grants from the Social Science Research Council, The Wenner Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the American Institute of Iranian Studies, NYU’s Torch Fellowship the National Science Foundation (awarded/declined), and the a Dean’s Dissertation Fellowship at NYU. She is the director of The Skin That Burns, a documentary film about survivors of chemical warfare in Iran, distributed by Film Media Group. Narges writes on Iran for The Guardian, Middle East Research and Information Project (MERIP), The Huffington Post, LobeLog, and IranWire. She has also appeared as a guest commentator on Iranian politics on DemocracyNow!, NPR, BBC WorldService, BBC Persian, and HuffPost Live.

Valeria G. Castelli

Valeria G. Castelli

Pubilc Humanities Fellow; Doctoral Student, Department of Italian Studies, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Valeria G. Castelli is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Italian Studies at New York University. Her doctoral dissertation is entitled: Ethics, Performativity and Action in Contemporary Italian Documentary Film (2001-2014). Valeria received her Laurea in Lettere Moderne with a specialization in Modern Philology from the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano and her M.A. in Italian Studies from the University College of London. Her research interests include: Modern and Contemporary Italian Literature, Cultural Studies, Documentary Film, Media and Film Studies, Italian Poetry, Ethics, Activism and Social Change. In Spring 2015, Valeria was a Remarque Institute Doctoral Fellow at NYU. She is the recipient of a 2015-2016 Public Humanities Fellowship at the New York Council for the Humanities and the NYU Center for the Humanities.

Patrick Deer

Patrick Deer

Faculty Fellow; Associate Professor, Department of English, Faculty of Arts & Science

Patrick Deer is Associate Professor of English. He is the author of Culture in Camouflage: War, Empire and Modern British Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009; paperback, forthcoming fall 2015), and has published widely on war culture and war literature, modernism, and the novel, music and film. He is currently working on two book projects about twentieth and twenty-first century transatlantic literature and culture: Surge and Silence: Understanding America’s Cultures of War; and Deep England: Forging British Culture After Empire. He guest edited special issues of Social Text on The Ends of War (ST 91, Summer 2007) and co-edited Punk and Its Afterlives (ST 113, Fall 2013). He is co-organizer of NYU’s Cultures of War and the Post-War research collaborative, which was begun with Humanities Initiative support.

Hi’ilei Julia Hobart

Hi’ilei Julia Hobart

Doctoral Student Fellow; Doctoral Student, Department of Nutrition & Food Studies, and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Hiʻilei Julia Kawehipuaʻakahaʻopulani Hobart is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Food Studies at New York University. She holds an M.A. in Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design and Culture from the Bard Graduate Center, an M.L.S. in Library Science and Archives Management from Pratt Institute, and a B.A. in English and Creative Writing from Colby College. She is broadly interested in indigenous history, temperature, and technology infrastructures. Her dissertation, entitled “Tropical Necessities: Ice, Territory, and Taste in Hawaiʻi” is a commodity history of comestible ice. In particular, the study examines the development of the taste for coldness and affective experiences of Hawaiʻi’s settler colonial society. She is the founder and organizer of the NYC-Pacific Studies Working Group and is currently guest editing a journal issue of Food, Culture, and Society on the food systems of Hawai‘i.

Sean Larson

Sean Larson

Doctoral Student Fellow; Doctoral Student, Department of German, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Sean Larson is a doctoral candidate in the Department of German at NYU. His research interests include Marxism, aesthetic theory, psychoanalysis, political economy, and revolution. Sean previously studied Political Theory and Philosophy at the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität in Munich as well as German and Spanish Literature at the University of Florida. His dissertation project investigates the social and economic transformations brought about during the German Revolution of 1918-23 and their impact upon the core aesthetic trends of the Weimar Republic, including “New Objectivity” literature, Bertolt Brecht’s theatre, and the circle of humanist philosophers and art historians around Aby Warburg.

Anna McCarthy

Faculty Fellow; Professor, Department of Cinema Studies, Tisch School of the Arts

Anna McCarthy, Professor of Cinema Studies in Tisch School of the Arts, is the author of two books–Ambient Television (2001), The Citizen Machine, (2010)–and co-editor of the 2004 anthology MediaSpace. for eight years she was a co-editor of the journal Social Text. Her current research explores the digital commodity we commonly refer to as content. Content is the product of a casualized, high yield, piecework economy, and the content market has developed its own rules of supply and forms of value. To grasp them, McCarthy’s research combines the work of theory and the eye level analysis of a participant. This year she will also begin work on an account of media and religion in 20th century Ireland.

Charlton McIlwain

Charlton McIlwain

Faculty Fellow; Associate Professor, Department of Media, Culture and Communication, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Charlton McIlwain (Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 2001) is an Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. His research focuses on the intersection of race, media and politics. In addition to continuing work on race and political campaigns, he currently studies the influence of digital media in contemporary racial justice activism. He is the co-author of the award winning book, Race Appeal (Temple, 2011), the Routledge Companion to Race & Ethnicity (Routledge, 2011), along with two additional books and numerous journal articles.

Andrew Needham

Faculty Fellow; Associate Professor, Department of History, Faculty of Arts & Science

No bio available.

Sean Nesselrode

Sean Nesselrode

Doctoral Student Fellow; Doctoral Student, Institute of Fine Arts

Sean Nesselrode is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Fine Arts, and he specializes in modern and contemporary art of the Americas. Research interests include peripheral modernities, narratives and counter-narratives of progress, and the politics of abstraction. He earned his BA in Art History and English Literature at Swarthmore College and his MA in the History of Art and Archaeology from New York University. His dissertation examines the artistic development of Venezuelan modernism(s) through the lens of petroleum as a real and imagined source of progress. His writings have been published in Caiana: Revista de Historia del Arte y Cultura Visual del Centro Argentino de Investigadores de Arte, ICAA Documents Project Working Papers, and Hemisphere: Visual Cultures of the Americas (forthcoming).

Lana Povitz

Lana Povitz

Public Humanities Fellow; Doctoral Student, Department of History, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Lana Dee Povitz is a doctoral candidate in U.S. history at New York University. Her dissertation, A Taste of What It Takes: Food Activism in New York City explores the central role food has played in building and sustaining community since the 1960s, whether through mothers monitoring school lunch programs in the South Bronx, volunteers delivering meals for people with AIDS, or young New Leftists establishing the Park Slope Food Coop. Lana is engaged in an array of contemporary social struggles, including those for peace, prison abolition, and queer and feminist movement.

Myisha Priest

Faculty Fellow; Associate Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

No bio available.

Luke Stark

Luke Stark

Doctoral Student Fellow; Doctoral Student, Department of Media, Culture and Communication, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Luke Stark is doctoral candidate in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University under the supervision of Helen Nissenbaum. His dissertation project, “Self-Managed Feeling: Psychology and Interaction Design from Smartphones to the Anxious Seat,” is a genealogy of digital mood tracking applications, and explores how psychological tools and techniques have been built into the design of the mobile device we use on a daily basis. With a focus on affect and emotion, Luke’s broader scholarship explores the changing nature of human subjectivity in the computational age. Luke holds an Honours BA in History & English and an MA in History, both from the University of Toronto; he has been generously funded by the National Science Foundation, New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and the Provost’s Global Research Initiative, the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, and Microsoft Research.

Deborah Willis

Deborah Willis

Faculty Fellow; University Professor, Department of Photography and Imaging, Tisch School of the Arts

Deborah Willis, Ph.D, is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and has an affiliated appointment with the College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Social & Cultural, Africana Studies, where she teaches courses on photography and imaging, iconicity, and cultural histories visualizing the black body, women, and gender. Her research examines photography’s multifaceted histories, visual culture, the photographic history of Slavery and Emancipation; contemporary women photographers and beauty. She received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and was a Richard D. Cohen Fellow in African and African American Art, Hutchins Center, Harvard University amd a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow. Professor Willis received the NAACP Image Award in 2014 for her co-authored book (with Barbara Krauthamer) “Envisioning Emancipation.” Other notable projects include “The Black Female Body A Photographic History,” “Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers – 1840 to the Present;” “Posing Beauty: African American Images from the 1890s to the Present;” “Michelle Obama: The First Lady in Photographs,” a NAACP Image Award Literature Winner, and “Black Venus 2010: They Called Her ‘Hottentot.’”