Events Archive

Sonic Sea (2017) Film and Q&A

Date: December 4, 2018

*This event is at capacity. Registration does not guarantee seating. Seating is first come, first serve.*

Throughout the ocean, whales depend on sound to mate, find food, migrate, and defend against predators. A century ago the seas were silent, but now humans fill them with an unbearable cacophony – the sonic “bombs” of oil prospectors, the whirr of freight ships, the shrieks of military sonar – driving whales to death and disorientation. Sonic Sea (2017), narrated by Rachel McAdams and featuring Sting, tells the story of Ken Balcomb, a former Navy officer who solved the tragic mystery of a mass stranding, and the global network of scientists working to limit our deadly clamor.

Join us for the screening of Sonic Sea. Following the film, there will be a Q&A with Dr. Howard Rosenbaum, Ocean Giants Director, Wildlife Conservation Society, who will be joined by Environmental Studies and Animal Studies faculty and scholars including Jennifer Jacquet (Assistant Professor Environmental Studies, NYU) and Yanoula Athanassakis (Director of the Environmental Humanities Initiative, NYU).

Co-sponsored by NYU Animal Studies, Nandini Thiyagarajan (Animal Studies Fellow, NYU).

**Event location has been changed to NYU Production Lab, 16 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003.**

Event Location:
NYU Production Lab
16 Washington Place
New York, NY
10003


Julius Rosenwald: Repairing the World

Date: November 13, 2018

Julius Rosenwald (1862–1932) rose from modest means as the son of a peddler to meteoric wealth at the helm of Sears, Roebuck. Yet his most important legacy stands not upon his business acumen but on the pioneering changes he introduced to the practice of philanthropy. In this biography, Hasia Diner explores Rosenwald's attitudes toward his own wealth and his distinct ideas about philanthropy, positing an intimate connection between his Jewish consciousness and his involvement with African Americans. The book shines light on his belief in the importance of giving in the present to make an impact on the future, and on his encouragement of beneficiaries to become partners in community institutions and projects.

Join us as we examine how Rosenwald's compassion and wisdom transformed the practice of philanthropy itself.

Featuring Hasia Diner (Author, Paul & Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History and Director of the Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History at New York University) and Robert Cohen (Professor of Social Studies Education and History, NYU).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


The Postcolonial Contemporary: Political Imaginaries for the Global Present

Date: October 30, 2018

In twelve essays that draw from a number of disciplines—history, anthropology, literature, geography, indigenous studies— and regional locations (the Black Atlantic, South Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Australia, Argentina) The Postcolonial Contemporary (Fordham UP, 2018) seeks to move beyond the habitual oppositions that have often characterized the field: universal vs. particular; Marxism vs. postcolonialism; politics vs. culture. The essays reckon with new and persisting postcolonial predicaments, doing so under four interrelated analytics: postcolonial temporality; deprovincializing the global south; beyond Marxism versus postcolonial studies; and postcolonial spatiality and new political imaginaries.

Join us to celebrate this new volume and to reflect on the project with the book's editors, Jini Kim Watson and Gary Wilder, and several contributors.

Featuring:

Jini Kim Watson
Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, NYU

Gary Wilder
Professor of Anthropology and History, CUNY Graduate Center

Anthony Alessandrini
Professor of English and Middle Eastern Studies, Kingsborough Community College & CUNY Graduate Center

Laurie Lambert
Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies, Fordham University

Sadia Abbas
Associate Professor of English, Rutgers Newark

Moderated by Crystal Parikh, Professor of English and Social & Cultural Analysis, NYU.

Co-sponsored by The NYU Postcolonial, Race and Diaspora Studies Colloquium.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Narrowcast: Poetry and Audio Research

Date: October 23, 2018

Narrowcast explores how mid-century American poets associated with the New Left mobilized tape recording as a new form of sonic field research even as they themselves were being subjected to tape-based surveillance. Media theorists tend to understand audio recording as a technique for separating bodies from sounds, but this book listens closely to tape's embedded information, offering a counterintuitive site-specific account of 1960s poetic recordings. Arguing that CIA and FBI "researchers" shared unexpected terrain not only with poets, but with famous theorists such as Fredric Jameson and Hayden White. Author, Lytle Shaw reframes the status of tape recordings in postwar poetics and challenges notions of how tape might be understood as a mode of evidence. Join us to reflect on the project with the book's author and other featured panelists.

Julie Beth Napolin
Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, The New School

David Grubbs
Professor of Music, Brooklyn College

J. Martin Daughtry
Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology & Sound Studies, NYU

Lytle Shaw
Author, Professor of English, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Environmental Art: Re-Imagining Art, Science, and the Humanities

Date: October 16, 2018

An evening with artist-scholars Elaine Gan (Experimental Humanities), and Marina Zurkow (Tisch School of the Arts), in conversation with Una Chaudhuri (Experimental Humanities), and Yanoula Athanassakis (Environmental Humanities). Gan and Zurkow’s respective bodies of work engage in public humanities and collaborative experiments that draw on the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences to ask questions about radical pluralities of more-than-human worlds. By presenting a series of collaborative experiments, the conversation will focus on the creative and critical lenses through which climate change becomes sensible to new publics.

Marina Zurkow
Professor of Art, Tisch School of Arts, NYU

Elaine Gan
Center for Experimental Humanities Faculty Fellow, NYU

Una Chaudhuri
Professor of English & Animal Studies, NYU

Yanoula Athanassakis
Director of Environmental Humanities Initiative, NYU

Co-sponsored by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and the Center for Experimental Humanities.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States