Great New Books in the Humanities

The Postcolonial Contemporary: Political Imaginaries for the Global Present

Date: October 30, 2018

In twelve essays that draw from a number of disciplines—history, anthropology, literature, geography, indigenous studies— and regional locations (the Black Atlantic, South Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Australia, Argentina) The Postcolonial Contemporary (Fordham UP, 2018) seeks to move beyond the habitual oppositions that have often characterized the field: universal vs. particular; Marxism vs. postcolonialism; politics vs. culture. The essays reckon with new and persisting postcolonial predicaments, doing so under four interrelated analytics: postcolonial temporality; deprovincializing the global south; beyond Marxism versus postcolonial studies; and postcolonial spatiality and new political imaginaries.

Join us to celebrate this new volume and to reflect on the project with the book's editors, Jini Kim Watson and Gary Wilder, and several contributors.

Featuring:

Jini Kim Watson
Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, NYU

Gary Wilder
Professor of Anthropology and History, CUNY Graduate Center

Anthony Alessandrini
Professor of English and Middle Eastern Studies, Kingsborough Community College & CUNY Graduate Center

Laurie Lambert
Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies, Fordham University

Sadia Abbas
Associate Professor of English, Rutgers Newark

Moderated by Crystal Parikh, Professor of English and Social & Cultural Analysis, NYU.

Co-sponsored by The NYU Postcolonial, Race and Diaspora Studies Colloquium.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Narrowcast: Poetry and Audio Research

Date: October 23, 2018

Narrowcast explores how mid-century American poets associated with the New Left mobilized tape recording as a new form of sonic field research even as they themselves were being subjected to tape-based surveillance. Media theorists tend to understand audio recording as a technique for separating bodies from sounds, but this book listens closely to tape's embedded information, offering a counterintuitive site-specific account of 1960s poetic recordings. Arguing that CIA and FBI "researchers" shared unexpected terrain not only with poets, but with famous theorists such as Fredric Jameson and Hayden White. Author, Lytle Shaw reframes the status of tape recordings in postwar poetics and challenges notions of how tape might be understood as a mode of evidence. Join us to reflect on the project with the book's author and other featured panelists.

Julie Beth Napolin
Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, The New School

David Grubbs
Professor of Music, Brooklyn College

J. Martin Daughtry
Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology & Sound Studies, NYU

Lytle Shaw
Author, Professor of English, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Bright Signals: A History of Color Television

Date: September 25, 2018

*This event is at capacity. Registration does not guarantee seating. Seats are first-come, first-serve.*

In Bright Signals, Susan Murray explores an over forty-year history of the technological, aesthetic, industrial, and cultural development of color television, which was imagined and sold as a new way of seeing, an ideal form of modern American consumer vision that promised a spectacular sense of proximity and immersion. She argues that color television was an incredibly complex technology of visual culture that reframed the very idea of television, while also revealing deep tensions and aspirations about technology’s relationship to and perspective on the “natural” world and, relatedly, our potential to extend human sight and experience. Join us to celebrate the book’s release and and an in-depth discussion with the author.

Featuring Susan Murray (Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, the author of Hitch Your Antenna to the Stars: Early Television and Broadcast Stardom, and the coeditor of Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture.), with introduction by Anna McCarthy, Professor and Chair, Department of Cinema Studies, NYU.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Department of Media, Culture, and Communication.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


James Baldwin's Story of Childhood: A Symposium

Date: September 11, 2018

*This event is at capacity. Registration does not guarantee seating. Seats are first-come, first-serve.*

Join us for the launch event for a new edition of James Baldwin’s book, Little Man, Little Man: A Story of Childhood (Duke University Press) featuring a panel of scholars, archivists, and contributors, including Baldwin’s nephew Tejan Karefa-Smart and his niece Aisha Karefa-Smart. Hosted by the book's co-editors Nicholas Boggs (Department of English, NYU) and Jennifer DeVere Brody (Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Stanford).

Aisha Karefa-Smart
Author and Educator

Tejan Karefa-Smart
Photographer and Digital Media Artist

Steven Fullwood
Independent Archivist and Curator

Dagmawi Woubshet
Ahuja Family Presidential Associate Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania

Moderated by Sybil Cooksey, Clinical Assistant Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU.

Co-sponsored by the NYU Center for Humanities and the NYU Department of English. Reception to follow.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Writing Human Rights: The Political Imaginaries of Writers of Color

Date: March 20, 2018

Crystal Parikh's Writing Human Rights: The Political Imaginaries of Writers of Color contends that unlike humanitarianism, which views its objects as victims, human rights provide avenues for the creation of political subjects. Join us for a panel discussion, with the author, exploring how the book illuminates a human rights critique of idealized American rights and freedoms that have been globalized in the twenty-first century. Participants include:

Lisa Duggan
Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

Jeffrey Flynn
Associate Professor, Philosophy Department, Fordham University

Crystal Parikh (author)
Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, Asian/Pacific/American Institute, NYU

Moderated by Cristina Beltran, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States