Books in the Humanities Now

A Coming Word: Werner Hamacher, Paul Celan

Date: October 10, 2019

Throughout his work, German philosopher, literary theorist, and translator Werner Hamacher was profoundly engaged with the poetry of Paul Celan which he viewed as a way of tapping into the fundamental occurrence of language. Under the title “Keinmaleins,” a collection of Hamacher’s reflections on Celan was published earlier this year in which especially Celan’s relation to what is called “philosophy” is at stake: in his essays, Hamacher discusses Celan’s appropriation of Benjamin and Parmenides, his missed encounters with Heidegger and Adorno, his poetic reworking of Husserl’s phenomenology.

This roundtable will deliver a series of responses to Hamacher and Celan—and their (missed) encounter—in order to assess the relationship between thought and poetry, and ask about the future of literary criticism: a coming word.

Featuring:

Ian Fleishman
Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania

Judith Kasper
Professor, Goethe University Frankfurt

Michael Levine
Professor, Rutgers University

Kristina Mendicino
Associate Professor, Brown University

Dominik Zechner
Artemis A.W. and Martha Joukowsky Postdoctoral Fellow, Brown University

Co-sponsored by the NYU Department of German, the NYU Department of Comparative Literature, Department of German Studies, Brown University, Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Brown University, & Department of German, Russian, and East European Languages and Literatures, Rutgers University.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Blood Libel in the United States. It happened here.

Date: September 24, 2019

Join us for the exciting launch of The Accusation by Ed Berenson (Professor & Chair, Department of History, NYU). Invited panelists will discuss the disturbing story of one town's embrace of an insidious anti-Jewish myth. The Accusation is a shocking and perceptive exploration of American and European responses to antisemitism.

Featuring:

Ed Berenson
Professor & Chair, Department of History, NYU

Elissa Bemporad
Associate Professor, Department of History, CUNY Graduate Center

Zvi Ben-Dor Benite
Professor, Department of History & Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, NYU

Andrew Needham
Associate Professor, Department of History, NYU

Thane Rosenbaum
Distinguished Fellow, NYU School of Law

Moderated by Marion Kaplan (Professor, Hebrew and Judaic Studies, NYU).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Imagining Color: a public lecture by Elaine Scarry

Date: May 2, 2019

New York Institute for the Humanities and NYU Center for the Humanities present:

Imagining X 2
Two Events on Visual and Poetic Imagination

Elaine Scarry is the Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value at Harvard University. She is the author of The Body in Pain, Resisting Representation, Dreaming by the Book, On Beauty and Being Just, Who Defended the Country?, Rule of Law, Misrule of Men, Thinking in an Emergency, Thermonuclear Monarchy, and Naming Thy Name.

Co-sponsored by the Literary Reportage Program, Arthur L. Carter Journalism
Institute.

Please stay tuned for Imagining X 2 II: Imagining Experience.

*This event is at capacity. Registration does not guarantee seating. Seating is first come, first serve.*

Event Location:
NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003


For a Logic of Poetic Space: "The Off-Screen"

Date: April 24, 2019

For a Logic of Poetic Space I: “The Off-Screen”

Please join us for a workshop on Eyal Peretz’s landmark book The Off-Screen: An Investigation of the Cinematic Frame.

From the Renaissance on, a new concept of the frame organizes a range of artistic media that are fascinated by it: the modern theatrical stage, framed paintings, the novel, the cinematic off-screen. The frame decontextualizes, cutting everything within it from the continuity of the world and creating a realm of fiction. But what is outside the frame, what is offstage, or off-screen, remains mysterious. It constitutes the primary enigma of the work of art in the modern age.

What is the nature of the cinematic frame and its implication with aesthetic, theological, political, and historical questions? What is the singularity of the art of film and its place within the arts of modernity? How does the off-screen animate the relationship between philosophy and film?

 A selection of The Off-Screen is available here.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Broadway to Main Street: How Showtunes Enchanted America

Date: March 26, 2019

The music of Broadway is one of America's most unique and popular calling cards. In Broadway to Main Street: How Show Tunes Enchanted America, author Laurence Maslon tells the story of how the most beloved songs of the American Musical Theater made their way from the Theater District to living rooms across the country. This talk will investigate the immense appeal of the Broadway song book as heard by millions of Americans through original cast albums, pop recordings, radio, and television.

Featuring Laurence Maslon, Arts Professor, Associate Chair, Grad Acting Program, NYU Tisch, in conversation with Amanda Vaill, Biographer, Journalist, and Screenwriter.

Reviews:

"Broadway to Main Street: How Show Tunes Enchanted America (Oxford University Press) is the first book I know to focus exhaustively on the rise of the modern cast album . . . Well-researched and well-written by Laurence Maslon, an Emmy-nominated producer and author-educator, the book tells a fascinating and little-known story about how Broadway theater rose to an influential position in American culture via records, television and Top-40 radio, all fueled by bestselling cast albums . . . The book fills a gap in history about an undervalued subject: the challenges of using limited technology to capture and preserve popular recordings for the masses and later generations." --The Columbus Dispatch

"Maslon's book explains the phenomenon of how show tunes have endured as an integral part of our popular culture. He also addresses the influence of the range of media on show music's popularity - from sheet music, radio and 78-rpm recordings to television, CDs, the Internet and streaming." --The Albuquerque Journal

"Laurence Maslon, who knows as much as about the American Musical Theater as anyone on Planet Showbiz, explores the multi-layered bond between the phenomenon of the original cast album from Oklahoma! to Hamilton and its impact on the music industry. By focusing on the 'business' part of show business, Maslon opens a fascinating new door into the history of what just might be America's Greatest Treasure." -- John Guare, Playwright

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States