Elements of a Philosophy of Technology

Date: January 29, 2019

Ernst Kapp’s 1877 Elements of a Philosophy of Technology is nothing less than the emergence of early elements of a cybernetic paradigm. Join us to celebrate a new 2018 edition of this book, translated into English for the first time.

Leif Weatherby (Associate Professor of German, NYU), Jeffrey Kirkwood (Assistant Professor of Art History, Binghamton University) will be joined by Lisa Gitelman (Professor of English and Media, Culture, and Communications, NYU) and John Durham Peters (María Rosa Menocal Professor of English and of Film & Media Studies, Yale University) to discuss this 1877 treatise that coined the phrase “philosophy of technology".

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Publishing the Avant-Garde: International Perspectives on Art and Magazines

Date: February 5, 2019

Bringing together a group of scholars working at the intersection of printed matter and visual culture this panel will ask, how does the periodical help us tell cultural histories across geographies? To frame this conversation, Lori Cole (NYU) and Meghan Forbes (MoMA), along with invited panelists Amin Alsaden (independent curator), Olubukola Gbadegesin (St. Louis University), and Naomi Kuromiya (Columbia University), will introduce a range of magazines produced and distributed in disparate contexts: Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Central Europe, and Latin America. Through a series of case studies, the panel aims to build a framework for examining magazines as a mode of circulation and exhibition of artwork. Together we will consider what periodicals and other printed ephemera have been left out of cultural histories—both in print and through contemporary collection and exhibition practices—and how new research can address these gaps.

Featuring:

Amin Alsaden
“Publishing Resistance: Agency and Exchanges in Post-WWII Baghdad”

Olubukola Gbadegesin
“The Yoruba Photoplay Series: Photographs, Popular Arts, and Print Culture in Lagos”

Naomi Kuromiya
“Circulating Exhibitions: the Display of Artwork in the Japanese Calligraphy Periodical Bokubi (1951-1960)”

Moderated by Lori Cole (Clinical Associate Professor & Associate Director of XE: Experimental Humanities & Social Engagement, NYU) and Meghan Forbes (Contemporary and Modern Art Perspectives Fellow for Central and Eastern Europe at The Museum of Modern Art in New York & a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Public Knowledge, NYU).

Co-sponsored by XE: Experimental Humanities & Social Engagement, the Department of Comparative Literature, the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, and the Institute for Public Knowledge.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Medicine, and the Great War

Date: February 19, 2019

The injuries suffered by soldiers during WWI were as varied as they were brutal. How could the human body suffer and often absorb such disparate traumas? Why might the same wound lead one soldier to die but allow another to recover?

In The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe, Stefanos Geroulanos (Professor of History, NYU) and Todd Meyers (Associate Professor of Anthropology, NYU Shanghai) uncover a fascinating story of how medical scientists came to conceptualize the body as an integrated yet brittle whole. Responding to the harrowing experience of the Great War, the medical community sought conceptual frameworks to understand bodily shock, brain injury, and the vast differences in patient responses they occasioned. Geroulanos and Meyers carefully trace how this emerging constellation of ideas became essential for thinking about integration, individuality, fragility, and collapse far beyond medicine: in fields as diverse as anthropology, political economy, psychoanalysis, and cybernetics.

Join us for an in-depth discussion with the authors and other featured panelists analyzing the various themes and stories surrounding these ideas. Featuring:

Emily Martin
Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, NYU

Samuel Moyn
Professor of Law and History, Yale University

With an introduction by Dr. Katherine E. Fleming, NYU Provost.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Environmental Martyrs and the Fate of the Forests

Date: February 26, 2019

This talk will address the current surge in environmental martyrdom against the backdrop of the resource wars across the global South. Rob Nixon asks: what is the relationship between the sacrificial figure of the environmental martyr and the proliferation of sacrifice zones under neoliberal globalization? And, in the battles over the fate of the planet’s forests, what is the relationship between the fallen martyr and the felled tree?

Featuring Rob Nixon, Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Family Professor in the Humanities and the Environment at Princeton University and author of his most recent book, Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States