Remote Care: From the "Electronic Patient" to Self-Tracking

Date: October 9, 2018

Practices of care and intervention—whether medical or psychological— have been rich in specialized communications between clinicians and patients and clinicians and clinicians, across many historical periods. The meanings and uses of these communications, however, have shifted with the development of new media and new technologies, which allow these communications to happen at a distance. This panel will consider technological interventions and augmentations of remote care, from the “Electronic Patient” and tele-medicine to self-tracking apps. By considering the media and technology intertwined with scenes of care, panelists will explore how changes in these kinds of communications relate to changes in the practice of care. Panelists include:

Jeremy Greene
Professor of Medicine and the History of Medicine,
Elizabeth Treide and A. McGehee Harvey Chair in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Natasha Schull
Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU

Kelli Moore
Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU

Hannah Zeavin
Lecturer, Department of English, UC Berkeley

Moderated by Lisa Gitelman, Professor of Media and English, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Environmental Art: Re-Imagining Art, Science, and the Humanities

Date: October 16, 2018

An evening with artist-scholars Elaine Gan (Experimental Humanities), and Marina Zurkow (Tisch School of the Arts), in conversation with Una Chaudhuri (Experimental Humanities), and Yanoula Athanassakis (Environmental Humanities). Gan and Zurkow’s respective bodies of work engage in public humanities and collaborative experiments that draw on the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences to ask questions about radical pluralities of more-than-human worlds. By presenting a series of collaborative experiments, the conversation will focus on the creative and critical lenses through which climate change becomes sensible to new publics.

Marina Zurkow
Professor of Art, Tisch School of Arts, NYU

Elaine Gan
Center for Experimental Humanities Faculty Fellow, NYU

Una Chaudhuri
Professor of English & Animal Studies, NYU

Yanoula Athanassakis
Director of Environmental Humanities Initiative, NYU

Co-sponsored by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and the Center for Experimental Humanities.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Narrowcast: Poetry and Audio Research

Date: October 23, 2018

Narrowcast explores how mid-century American poets associated with the New Left mobilized tape recording as a new form of sonic field research even as they themselves were being subjected to tape-based surveillance. Media theorists tend to understand audio recording as a technique for separating bodies from sounds, but this book listens closely to tape's embedded information, offering a counterintuitive site-specific account of 1960s poetic recordings. Arguing that CIA and FBI "researchers" shared unexpected terrain not only with poets, but with famous theorists such as Fredric Jameson and Hayden White. Author, Lytle Shaw reframes the status of tape recordings in postwar poetics and challenges notions of how tape might be understood as a mode of evidence. Join us to reflect on the project with the book's author and other featured panelists.

Julie Beth Napolin
Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, The New School

David Grubbs
Professor of Music, Brooklyn College

J. Martin Daughtry
Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology & Sound Studies, NYU

Lytle Shaw
Author, Professor of English, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


The Postcolonial Contemporary: Political Imaginaries for the Global Present

Date: October 30, 2018

In twelve essays that draw from a number of disciplines—history, anthropology, literature, geography, indigenous studies— and regional locations (the Black Atlantic, South Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Australia, Argentina) The Postcolonial Contemporary (Fordham UP, 2018) seeks to move beyond the habitual oppositions that have often characterized the field: universal vs. particular; Marxism vs. postcolonialism; politics vs. culture. The essays reckon with new and persisting postcolonial predicaments, doing so under four interrelated analytics: postcolonial temporality; deprovincializing the global south; beyond Marxism versus postcolonial studies; and postcolonial spatiality and new political imaginaries.

Join us to celebrate this new volume and to reflect on the project with the book's editors, Jini Kim Watson and Gary Wilder, and several contributors.

Featuring:

Jini Kim Watson
Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, NYU

Gary Wilder
Professor of Anthropology and History, CUNY Graduate Center

Anthony Alessandrini
Professor of English and Middle Eastern Studies, Kingsborough Community College & CUNY Graduate Center

Laurie Lambert
Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies, Fordham University

Sadia Abbas
Associate Professor of English, Rutgers Newark

Moderated by Crystal Parikh, Professor of English and Social & Cultural Analysis, NYU.

Co-sponsored by The NYU Postcolonial, Race and Diaspora Studies Colloquium.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States