Medical Humanities Series

The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe: Brittleness, Integration, Medicine, and the Great War

Date: February 19, 2019

The injuries suffered by soldiers during WWI were as varied as they were brutal. How could the human body suffer and often absorb such disparate traumas? Why might the same wound lead one soldier to die but allow another to recover?

In The Human Body in the Age of Catastrophe, Stefanos Geroulanos (Professor of History, NYU) and Todd Meyers (Associate Professor of Anthropology, NYU Shanghai) uncover a fascinating story of how medical scientists came to conceptualize the body as an integrated yet brittle whole. Responding to the harrowing experience of the Great War, the medical community sought conceptual frameworks to understand bodily shock, brain injury, and the vast differences in patient responses they occasioned. Geroulanos and Meyers carefully trace how this emerging constellation of ideas became essential for thinking about integration, individuality, fragility, and collapse far beyond medicine: in fields as diverse as anthropology, political economy, psychoanalysis, and cybernetics.

Join us for an in-depth discussion with the authors and other featured panelists analyzing the various themes and stories surrounding these ideas. Featuring:

Emily Martin
Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, NYU

Samuel Moyn
Professor of Law and History, Yale University

With an introduction by Dr. Katherine E. Fleming, NYU Provost.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


A Death of One's Own

Date: February 8, 2019

To be or not to be—who asks this question today, and how? What does it mean to issue, or respond to, an appeal for the right to die? In A Death of One’s Own: Literature, Law, and the Right to Die, Jared Stark takes up these timely questions by testing predominant legal understandings of assisted suicide and euthanasia against literary reflections on modern death from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rigorously interdisciplinary and lucidly argued, Stark’s wide-ranging discussion sheds critical light on the disquieting bioethical and biopolitical dilemmas raised by contemporary forms of medical technology and legal agency.

Join us to explore these themes with the author, Jared Stark (Professor of Comparative Literature, Eckerd College) and Cathy Caruth (Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters, Cornell University).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Remote Care: From the "Electronic Patient" to Self-Tracking

Date: October 9, 2018

Practices of care and intervention—whether medical or psychological— have been rich in specialized communications between clinicians and patients and clinicians and clinicians, across many historical periods. The meanings and uses of these communications, however, have shifted with the development of new media and new technologies, which allow these communications to happen at a distance. This panel will consider technological interventions and augmentations of remote care, from the “Electronic Patient” and tele-medicine to self-tracking apps. By considering the media and technology intertwined with scenes of care, panelists will explore how changes in these kinds of communications relate to changes in the practice of care. Panelists include:

Jeremy Greene
Professor of Medicine and the History of Medicine,
Elizabeth Treide and A. McGehee Harvey Chair in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Natasha Schull
Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU

Kelli Moore
Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU

Hannah Zeavin
Lecturer, Department of English, UC Berkeley

Moderated by Lisa Gitelman, Professor of Media and English, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States