Fellows, 2019-2020

at the NYU Center for the Humanities

Rafael Cesar

Rafael Cesar

Doctoral Student Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Fictions of Racelessness: The Latin American Racial Imaginaries of Angola (1901-2000)

Rafael Cesar is a PhD candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures. His dissertation, titled Fictions of Racelessness: The Latin American Racial Imaginaries of Angola, 1901-2002, examines the dominant current of Angolan nationalism in the twentieth century, which rejected expressions of blackness and race consciousness and forged an imaginary of a mixed-race nation at odds with its reality as a black-African country. By examining literature, press articles, political speeches, educational materials, letters and the documents of the liberation movements, my dissertation tracks the emergence of this discourse and shows that a nationalist, white-mestizo, creole elite in Angola, unidentified with black-African nationalisms, translated into Angola the Latin American imaginaries of race-mixing and racial harmony, mainly from Brazil and Cuba. This study calls this resulting imaginary the “fictions of racelessness.” My research agenda, broadly speaking, focuses on the circulation and political translation of racial imaginaries; intellectual history, literary and cultural production of Africa and Latin America; Bantu languages, cultures and identities in Africa and the African diaspora.

Daniella Gitlin

Daniella Gitlin

Public Humanities Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Social Documentary in the Americas / Documentales sociales en las Américas

Daniella Gitlin is a PhD candidate in NYU’s Comparative Literature Department pursuing a Certificate in Media and Culture. Her dissertation revolves around documentary media from mid-20th-century Argentina, the United States, and Palestine/Israel that responds to grave injustice. Daniella’s English translation of Rodolfo Walsh’s 1957 book-length work of investigative journalism, Operation Massacre, was published by Seven Stories Press in 2013. Her writing and translations have appeared in the London Review of Books blog, Huffington Post, CineAction, and Asymptote Journal, among other publications, and she is currently at work on a book about Israel. Daniella sits on the board of and helps run Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria, a nonprofit, bilingual community bookshop in Washington Heights staffed predominantly by volunteers. As a Public Humanities Fellow, Daniella is curating a bilingual series of screenings and discussions of social documentaries from the Americas at Word Up.

Marina Hassapopoulou

Marina Hassapopoulou

Faculty Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of Cinema Studies, Tisch School of the Arts

Project: Interactive Cinema: The Ethics of Participation and Collectivity in the Era of (Dis)Connection

Marina Hassapopoulou is Assistant Professor in the Department of Cinema Studies, and has served as Associate Co-Director of the Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program during AY2018-19, at Tisch School of the Arts. She has published articles and book chapters on topics including interactive cinema, digital spectatorship, border cinemas and migration, experimental and Hollywood production, fandom, representations of Hellenism in U.S. media, hybrid pedagogy, expanded television, and digital humanities. She teaches film studies, theory/philosophy, digital media, European cinema, digital humanities, cultural studies and theory-practice courses. Working on a range of media besides print, her projects include cultural videos for the University of Oregon’s folklore archives, multimedia scholarship, as well as online open-access collaborative initiatives. She is currently working on her book, Interactive Cinema: The Ethics of Participation and Collectivity in the Era of (Dis)Connection, which focuses on cross-cultural participatory multimedia experiments in the history of cinema and develops new sociopolitical frameworks for spectatorship in the digital age. She is also working on a number of digital humanities and mixed media projects on topics including local activism, collaborative remix, border cinemas, and experimental pedagogy.

Anna Kathryn Kendrick

Anna Kathryn Kendrick

Faculty Fellow; Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Humanities (European Literature), NYU Shanghai

Project: Altamira and the Avant-Garde: Literary Archaeologies of Francoist Spain

Anna Kathryn Kendrick is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Literature and Director of Global Awards at NYU Shanghai. Her first monograph, Humanizing Childhood in Early Twentieth Century Spain (Cambridge 2019), traces holistic theories and practices of child development within a rapidly-modernizing Spain as a complement and alternative to models of Catholic unity. During her year at the Center for the Humanities, she will begin a new project centered around the Paleolithic caves of Altamira, examining their public uses and rhetorical echoes in the work of Spanish poets and artists across the twentieth century. She holds an A.B. in History and Literature from Harvard, an MPhil in European Literature, and a PhD in Spanish from Cambridge University, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar.

Eugenia Kisin

Eugenia Kisin

Faculty Fellow; Assistant Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Project: Vital Currents: Decolonial Materialisms in Contemporary Art

Eugenia Kisin is assistant professor of art and society at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. She teaches classes about art and environmental justice, with a focus on contemporary Indigenous art in North America. Her book project, Aesthetics of Repair, considers how Indigenous artists extend ancestral protocols for bringing about just relations between persons, things, and territories in the extractive economies of the Pacific Northwest. Her Museum for Future Fossils project, an scholar’s workshop and summer school organized with Kirsty Robertson (Western University), explores curatorial practice in the Anthropocene. She is also co-curator of Overflow, a group exhibition of contemporary art on water, toxicity, and kinship (co-curated with Keith Miller and Kirsty Robertson).

Tatiana Linkhoeva

Tatiana Linkhoeva

Faculty Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of History, Faculty of Arts & Science

Project: Between the Hammer and the Anvil: Nomadic Migration between the Soviet Union, China, and Manchukuo, 1900–1950

Tatiana Linkhoeva is Assistant Professor of modern Japanese History at New York University. Her book, Revolution Goes East. Imperial Japan and Soviet Communism will be published by Cornell University Press in March 2020. Native of the republic of Buriatia (Russia), Linkhoeva graduated from Moscow State University with honors, received her MA from the University of Tokyo, and PhD in History from UC Berkeley. She has been awarded fellowships from Japan’s Ministry of Education, the Japan Foundation, UC Berkeley, and the German Excellence Initiative. Her new research project focuses on colonial policies by the Soviet and Japanese regimes on the Mongolian territories (Buriatia, Outer and Inner Mongolia). The historiographical division between the communist bloc (Russia/Buriatia/Outer Mongolia/communist China) and the anticommunist bloc (Japan/Inner Mongolia/Manchuria/Republican China) has precluded identifying strategies and policies that great powers, regardless of their ideological preferences, deploy in dealing with “small people” caught in the regional power struggles. The project shifts away from these national/ist perspectives and places compartmentalized experiences of the Mongols in the center of a history.

Amy Obermeyer

Amy Obermeyer

Doctoral Student Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Modern Poses: The Subject of Early-twentieth Century Japanese and Latin American Literatures

Amy Obermeyer is a doctoral candidate in New York University’s Department of Comparative Literature. Her research focuses on literary subjectivity in Japanese and Latin American literature from the late-nineteenth through early-twentieth centuries, particularly as manifest in the Japanese shishousetsu and modernismo in Latin America. Drawing from a main corpus consisting of authors such as José Asunción Silva, Tayama Katai, Aurora Cáceres, Tamura Toshiko, Teresa de la Parra, and Uno Chiyo, her dissertation interrogates at once the notion of the world (and world literature) and the subject within, with a particular focus on how gender shapes these articulations on a foundational level. Her principle theoretical interests include phenomenology, Marxist theory, and feminist theory. Amy has been a member of the editorial collective at Barricade: A Journal of Antifascism and Translation since its establishment in 2017, and she was previously a co-organizer of NYU’s Feminist Reading Group.

Laura Quinton

Laura Quinton

Doctoral Student Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of History, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Ballet Imperial: Dance and the Reinvention of the British State, c. 1945-70

Laura Quinton is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at NYU. Her dissertation examines British government support for ballet after World War II, exploring the relationship between dance aesthetics and the politics of national arts funding, public broadcasting, and cultural diplomacy. Her work has been supported by a CLIR Mellon Fellowship for Dissertation Research in Original Sources as well as grants from the Alumnae Association of Barnard College and NYU’s Center for Ballet and the Arts.

Susanah Romney

Susanah Romney

Faculty Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of History, Faculty of Arts & Science

Project: “As His Slave and Housewife”: Claiming Space in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Maritime Empire

Susanah Romney is an Assistant Professor in the History Department at NYU. She teaches courses on Atlantic history, early America, and Women and Gender. She earned her Ph.D. at Cornell University and her BA at the University of California Santa Cruz. She is the author of New Netherland Connections: Intimate Networks and Atlantic Ties in Seventeenth-Century America, which was the winner of the Jamestown Prize, the Hendricks Award, and the First Book Prize from the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians. She is currently at work on a study of gender, unfreedom, and claims to space in the seventeenth-century Dutch empire, focusing on Manhattan, Guayana, Java, and southern Africa. Her work helps uncover the roots of the racial and gender hierarchies that developed alongside the first global trade networks.

Maysam Taher

Maysam Taher

Doctoral Student Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Borders in Disrepair: Archival Excavations and Present Crisis at the Hinges of the Mediterranean

Maysam Taher is a doctoral candidate in the NYU department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies. Her dissertation “Borders in Disrepair: Archival Excavations and Present Crises at the Hinges of the Mediterranean” takes a treaty of colonial reparations signed by Silvio Berlusconi and Muammar Gaddafi in 2008 as a point of departure to examine how such a document came to perform a dual contradictory function: that of compensating Libya for colonial crimes committed by Italy between 1911 and 1947 through $5 billion in infrastructural investments, and that of formalizing an extraterritorial infrastructure of European border policing located in Libya. Her project restages the binational efforts in research and historiography that articulated the claim for reparations in order to demonstrate how colonial archives, their postcolonial rearrangements, and their counter-archival off-shoots are themselves institutions of border-making and unmaking, with material effects that can shape the present and open up multiple futures. Maysam was a 2017-2018 Graduate Fellow in Urban Practice at NYU’s Urban Democracy Lab and a recipient of the 2018 Robert Holmes Travel/Research Award for African Scholarship. She is a current contributing editor at The New Inquiry.

Alexandra Vazquez

Alexandra Vazquez

Faculty Fellow; Associate Professor, Department of Performance Studies, Tisch School of the Arts

Project: Music and Migrancy: Miami Experiments with Performance (1965-1995)

Alexandra T. Vazquez is Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University where she is also the Director of Graduate Studies. She is the author of Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music (Duke University Press 2013, winner of the American Studies Association’s Lora Romero Book Prize).  Before coming to NYU, Vazquez was an Assistant Professor at Princeton University and Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale University.  In 2010-2011 she was the recipient of a Woodrow Wilson Career Enhancement Fellowship. Vazquez’s work has been featured in the journals American Quarterly, small axe, Social Text, women and performance, the Journal of Popular Music Studies, and in the edited volumes Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas, Reggaeton, The Tide Was Always High, and Pop When the World Falls Apart. She is a proud graduate of the New World School of the Arts in Miami, Florida. Vazquez is currently working on two book projects:The Florida Room and Music and Migrancy: Miami Experiments with Performance (1965-1995).

Rachel Watson

Rachel Watson

Doctoral Student Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of French Literature, Thought and Culture, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Re-membering the body: the Epic, the Tragic, and the Blue Note in French Language Theater

Bio TBA.

Rustin Zarkar

Rustin Zarkar

Public Humanities Fellow; PhD Candidate, Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, Graduate School of Arts & Science

Project: Displaced Neighborhoods: Mapping Population Exchange between Yerevan, Baku, & New York

Rustin Zarkar is a PhD candidate in Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies at NYU. His research focuses on regimes of mobility and cultural history in and around the Caspian Sea during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He is the co-founder and editor of the Ajam Media Collective, an online space dedicated to culture and politics in Iran, Central Asia, the Caucasus, and South Asia. His project utilizes digital mapping, oral histories, and 360 and conventional documentary footage to explore the housing exchange that occurred between Armenian and Azerbaijani refugees in Baku and Yerevan during the Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict.

Alisa Zhulina

Alisa Zhulina

Faculty Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of Drama, Tisch School of the Arts

Project: Theatre of Capital: Staging the Economy from Henrik Ibsen to Lin-Manuel Miranda

Alisa Zhulina is an assistant professor at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in the Department of Drama. She is affiliated faculty with the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies. Her research interests include the intersections between theatre studies and economic theory, political theatre, modern drama, European theatre history, Eastern European performance, and new media. Her writings have appeared in Theatre JournalTheatre SurveyModern Drama, Performance Research, and several edited volumes. Her current book project, Theatre of Capital: Money, Finance, and Crisis on the Modern Stage, focuses on how theatre from the nineteenth century onward is invested in staging and challenging economic ideas.