All Events

Shakespeare's Wire

Date: September 16, 2015

Increasingly, a literary imagination structures contemporary quality television. In HBO’s series, The Wire, we witness the return of chess, the early modern aristocratic game of war. The Wire relates the codes of the drug war to the rules of this stylized war game. Elisabeth Bronfen brings The Wire into conversation with another set of dramatic productions on war: Shakespeare’s history plays. This event is cosponsored by the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication.

Elisabeth Bronfen
Professor of English and American Studies
University of Zürich
Global Distinguished Professor
German Department
New York University

Respondent:
John Archer
Professor
Department of English
New York University

Moderator:
Arvind Rajagopal
Professor
Department of Media, Culture and Communication
New York University

About Elisabeth Bronfen:

Elisabeth Bronfen is professor of English and American Studies at the University of Zürich, and, since 2007 Global Distinguished Professor in the German Department at NYU. She specializes in the interface between literary and visual culture, historical transformations through various media, psychoanalysis, and gender studies. Her publications include Home in Hollywood. The Imaginary Geography of Cinema (Columbia U. P.), Specters of War. Hollywood's Engagement with Military Conflict (Rutgers U.P.) and forthcoming Mad Men, Death and the American Dream (Chicago U.P./Diaphanes).

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Nixon and Kissinger

Date: September 30, 2015

Award-winning authors Tim Weiner and Greg Grandin will discuss their new books on two of America's most controversial public figures. Weiner's One Man Against the World and Grandin's Kissinger's Shadow examine the ongoing legacy of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger. The authors will discuss how Nixon's and Kissinger's actions and policies led first to the collapse of America's Cold War national security warfare state and then its restoration in new form, a restored imperial presidency (based on evermore spectacular displays of violence, more intense secrecy, and an increasing use of war and militarism to leverage domestic dissent and polarization for political advantage) capable of moving forward into a post-Vietnam world.  The event will be moderated by Professor Marilyn Young and is cosponsored by the New York Institute for the Humanities.

PARTICIPANTS:
Greg Grandin
Professor, Department of History, NYU

Tim Weiner
Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner

Marilyn Young
Professor, Department of History, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Great New Books in the Humanities: The Color of Modernity: São Paulo and the Making of Race and Nation in Brazil

Date: October 6, 2015

Join us for a discussion of race, gender, and regional inequality in the formation of national identities in Brazil in honor of Barbara Weinstein's new book, The Color of Modernity: São Paulo and the Making of Race and Nation in Brazil. Organized around two principal episodes—the 1932 Constitutionalist Revolution and 1954’s IV Centenário, the quadricentennial of São Paulo’s founding—this book shows how both elites and popular sectors in São Paulo embraced a regional identity that attributed the state's economic trajectory to their exceptional aptitude for modernity and progress, attributes that became—and remain—associated with “whiteness.” This evening will feature a panel of scholars of Latin America who will comment on this important new book.

Participants:

Barbara Weinstein
Professor, Department of History, NYU

Mary Roldán
Dorothy Epstein Chair in Latin American History, Hunter College

Sinclair Thomson
Associate Professor, Department of History, NYU

James Woodard
Associate Professor, Department of History, Montclair State University

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States