Digital Humanities Series

Remote Care: From the "Electronic Patient" to Self-Tracking

Date: October 9, 2018

Practices of care and intervention—whether medical or psychological— have been rich in specialized communications between clinicians and patients and clinicians and clinicians, across many historical periods. The meanings and uses of these communications, however, have shifted with the development of new media and new technologies, which allow these communications to happen at a distance. This panel will consider technological interventions and augmentations of remote care, from the “Electronic Patient” and tele-medicine to self-tracking apps. By considering the media and technology intertwined with scenes of care, panelists will explore how changes in these kinds of communications relate to changes in the practice of care. Panelists include:

Jeremy Greene
Professor of Medicine and the History of Medicine,
Elizabeth Treide and A. McGehee Harvey Chair in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Natasha Schull
Associate Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU

Kelli Moore
Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU

Hannah Zeavin
Lecturer, Department of English, UC Berkeley

Moderated by Lisa Gitelman, Professor of Media and English, NYU.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Building Project-Based Research Communities Around Humanities Data

Date: April 3, 2018

How might we build collaboration into the curation and interpretation of data in the humanities? How might a tool that facilitates the sharing of humanities data enable new kinds of networked research communities?

Following an introduction by Clay Shirky, Vice Provost for Educational Technology at NYU, Thomas Augst (English, NYU) and Nicholas Wolf (NYU Libraries) report on NewYorkScapes and its new accompanying website, a collaborative venture between NYU College of Arts and Sciences, NYU Libraries, and NYU IT, to build ties among researchers through project-based collaboration and support for place-based learning. With Seth Kaufman, founder of Brooklyn developer Whirl-i-gig, they will also introduce a prototype of  Inquisite, an open-source environment for building and sharing data collections for the purposes of teaching and research.

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Urban Digital Humanities: Design and Sustainability

Date: February 27, 2018

The quest to design digital and real solutions to environmental problems will be the theme of three interdisciplinary presentations crossing the boundaries of the humanities, architecture, and engineering.

Micro dwellings: where the Quantified Self meets the Quantified Home
Louise Harpman
Associate Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU

Architecture for Crickets and Butterflies
Mitchell Joachim
Associate Professor of Practice, Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU

Digital Pedagogy: School of the Earth, and more
Peder Anker
Associate Professor, Gallatin School of Individualized Study, NYU

Moderated by Marion Thain, Director of Digital Humanities, NYU

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


The ‘Crisis’ Humanities, and the Digital Humanities? New Directions in the Humanities

Date: November 14, 2017

We invite you to take part in a conversation about the future of the humanities. Where should we be headed, how are we responding to the ‘crisis’ in the humanities, and what is the role and significance of the digital humanities within these new trajectories?

Starting with brief presentations from some of those leading new initiatives in the humanities, the event will be devoted primarily to discussion with the audience: come and be part of the conversation.

Speakers to include:

Gigi Dopico
Dean of the Humanities in Arts and Science, NYU

David Hoover
Professor of English, NYU

Julie Mostov
Dean of Liberal Studies, NYU

Marion Thain
Director of Digital Humanities, NYU

David Wrisley
Associate Professor of Digital Humanities, NYU Abu Dhabi

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States


Queer Encoding: Encoding Diverse Identities

Date: April 28, 2017

How can the practice of digitization better respond to, and represent, geographically, culturally and otherwise, diverse textual identities? Come and hear leading practitioners in the field talk about how we might work creatively with mark-up languages to be more inclusive, and see strategies in action in the Project Hack.

Schedule:

  • 10:30AM — Introduction: What is TEI and why might I be interested? by Peter Logan (Professor of English and Academic Director of the Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University) and Marion Thain (Associate Director of Digital Humanities, New York University)
  • 11:00AM — Morning Keynote: Using TEI to Encode the History of Chinese Buddhism by Marcus Bingenheimer (Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, Temple University)
  • 12:30PM – Lunch
  • 1:30PM — Afternoon Keynote: Encoding Identity by Julia Flanders (Digital Scholarship Group Director and Professor of the Practice of English, Northeastern University)
  • 3:00PM — Afternoon Break
  • 3:15 - 5:00 PM — Project Hack: Queer Encoding in Action! & Closing Remarks
    • Queerness of Space Time and Text in the Independent Crusaders Mapping Project by Katherine Briant and Stephen Powell (Fordham University, MA Center for Medieval Studies)
    • Queer Encoding Challenges in The Making and Knowing Project by Sohini Chattopadhyay and Benjamin Hiebert (Columbia University)
    • Queer Encoding and Identity Formation in the Nineteenth-Century Manuscript Diary by Cherrie Kwok and Nicole Cote (New York University)

Program Partners:

  • NYU Digital Humanities
  • Fordham Digital Humanities Group, and Office of Research
  • Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University

Event Location:
NYU Center for the Humanities
20 Cooper Square
New York, NY
10003
United States